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Jennifer Thomas is an assistant professor in the department of media, journalism, and film at Howard University. © .
The best of times and the worst of times for journalism

Jennifer Thomas, an award-winning, veteran American broadcast journalist, was invited by the United States Embassy (South Africa) to address the Cape Town Press Club on media coverage of elections in the age of fake news late last month...

By Juanita Pienaar 14 Nov 2018

Media activist Angela Quintal reported to be safe
Media activist Angela Quintal reported to be safe

Media activist and former South African journalist and editor, Angela Quintal, has been interrogated in Tanzania...

By Louise Marsland 8 Nov 2018

Outrage at Nigerian media bill
Outrage at Nigerian media bill

Media rights groups in Nigeria are condemning a bill that will regulate the practice of journalism in the West African country...

By Louise Marsland 3 Aug 2018

How to deal with the troll armies
How to deal with the troll armies

Reporters Without Borders has recommended that media organisations and journalists around the world strengthen training in digital security in the face of increasing cyberviolence...

By Louise Marsland 31 Jul 2018

#NEWSWATCH: Zimbabwe uncertainty as state TV remains under control of military
#NEWSWATCH: Zimbabwe uncertainty as state TV remains under control of military

Zimbabwe remains on a knife edge as political uncertainty reigns and state television is under the control of the military...

By Louise Marsland 15 Nov 2017

The Gathering 2017 Media Edition.Credit: Ashraf Hendricks, GroundUp.org.za.
How to save SA from state capture and media elitism

Critical questions about SA's political future, media and its sustainability, and how to combat the fake news scourge, were all addressed at the Daily Maverick's The Gathering 2017 series...

By Louise Marsland 4 Aug 2017

Luke McKend. Credit: Ashraf Hendricks, GroundUp.org.za
Fake news is ‘weaponised social media'

Fake news is the new battleground for media freedom as social media is “weaponised” for propaganda purposes and fake news...

By Louise Marsland 3 Aug 2017

Imposing one story on Africa is doing it a disservice
Imposing one story on Africa is doing it a disservice

The African Media Leaders Forum in Addis Ababa last week ended on a weak note: Politicians want the media to generate a new, positive African narrative.

By Anton Harber 15 Nov 2013

Issa Sikiti da Silva
Social media, popular revolt: cure against African dictators?

The events and developments of the past six months in Africa have demonstrated that the rise of social media has not only revolutionised the business environment, but also redefined the political scene by shaking the foundation of dictatorship, lack of service delivery and corruption for the first time since the dawn of independences.

By Issa Sikiti da Silva 5 Jul 2011

African people disillusioned with leadership - Moeletsi Mbeki
African people disillusioned with leadership - Moeletsi Mbeki

"African people - like me - are completely disillusioned with the performance of their leaders because of what they have done and what they are doing, and for me these people should not be called leaders, but rather the elite," Moeletsi Mbeki, brother of former South African president Thabo Mbeki and chairman of the SA Institute of International Affairs, said, speaking at the CNN-MultiChoice media forum currently taking place in Bryanston, Johannesburg, on Friday, 24 June 2011.

By Issa Sikiti da Silva 24 Jun 2011

Concern mounts over missing SA journo as govt scrambles to assist
Concern mounts over missing SA journo as govt scrambles to assist

As concern mounts over the fate of Anton Hammerl, a South African photographer missing in Libya alongside two US journalists and one Spanish photographer, the Presidency said yesterday, Wednesday, 20 April 2011, that President Jacob Zuma has been briefed on the attempts made by the SA mission in Libya to locate Hammerl. Reports from Washington DC also suggest that the White House is very concerned about their well-being and it is trying hard to assist them in any way it can.

By Issa Sikiti da Silva 21 Apr 2011

African politicians ban media to avoid criticism - Henry Maina
African politicians ban media to avoid criticism - Henry Maina

The fundamental reason that many African governments ban and harass the media has more to do with personal connotations than other issues, Kenya's Henry Maina, director of Article 19 Eastern Africa, told delegates at the two-day Regulations and Rights media conference last week in Johannesburg.

By Issa Sikiti da Silva 16 Mar 2011

Dario Milo and media law: is legal sky a limit for journalists?
Dario Milo and media law: is legal sky a limit for journalists?

There is some substantiated regulation of what the media can do and what it cannot do, but the balance must be struck between what the law has prescribed and freedom of expression, Prof Dario Milo, Wits University media law visiting professor and Webber & Wentzel partner, said last week in Johannesburg at the two-day Regulations and Rights media conference.

By Issa Sikiti da Silva 15 Mar 2011

What to do with critical media: to regulate or not to regulate?
What to do with critical media: to regulate or not to regulate?

As governments across the African continent come under increasing pressure from critical media, 'vulture' ruling parties believe the only way to deal with this 'surrogate opposition' is to regulate it through statutory mechanisms that will eventually dent its wayward reporting. But some African voices of reason, such as Zambia's Fred M'membe, argue that the restriction of good media never produces good media.

By Issa Sikiti da Silva 14 Mar 2011

African media is surrogate opposition - Prof Tawana Kupe
African media is surrogate opposition - Prof Tawana Kupe

Due to the lack of a strong and united political opposition, the media in Africa, at least those that are critical of government policies, becomes a powerful force called a surrogate opposition, Prof Tawana Kupe, dean of faculty of humanities at Wits University, said this week in Johannesburg.

By Issa Sikiti da Silva 11 Mar 2011

Media freedom, self-regulation: the Ghanaian experience
Media freedom, self-regulation: the Ghanaian experience

Until 1992, journalists and editors in Ghana, and the independent media in general, have suffered a lot at the hands of undemocratic regimes, which cracked down on critical reporting and imposed strict restrictions limiting media freedom. As a new, liberal constitution was being written in 1992, media activists came out guns blazing, demanding that media suffering end and reporting become free. [view twitterfall]

By Issa Sikiti da Silva 10 Mar 2011

African media and the self-regulation dilemma
African media and the self-regulation dilemma

As the independent media in Africa is engaged in a fierce battle against repressive and not-so-democratic governments keen to sweep their corrupt wrongdoings under the carpet, the issue of self-regulation has become almost like a daily bread in many parts of the continent. [view twitterfall]

By Issa Sikiti da Silva 10 Mar 2011

Right of access to information hampered by govts - media conference
Right of access to information hampered by govts - media conference

The right of access to information is being hampered in many parts of the world, especially in Africa, by government officials wary of journalists' desire to 'embarrass' them, and the state's 'insincere' reason of hiding behind the issue of national security. This emerged today, Wednesday, 9 March 2011, at the Regulations and Rights media conference at Wits University in Johannesburg. [view twitterfall]

By Issa Sikiti da Silva 9 Mar 2011

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